Meet the maker: Hayley West


Hayley West Portrait
HOW DID YOU COME TO LOVE CERAMICS?
I started pursuing ceramics to make my own plant pots for my indoor plants. This was about 7 years ago. So far I have only managed to make two for myself in that time. I quickly recognised and was drawn to the methodical, disciplined approach to making with these clay and glazes. It is important to me to make good work and in respect of the history of the material and the impact on the environment. Rather than making for the sake of it. I also got very distracted by the need to make a living and was fortunate to have the opportunity to teach ceramics at Pine Street Creative Arts Centre and MakerSpace and Co.
In addition, I do a lot of teaching from my home studio Wells Street Studio. I have learnt more about ceramics from teaching than locking myself away in my studio. I owe a lot of my training (in both making and teaching) to my dear friend and mentor Anthony Brink.

CAN YOU TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT THE PLANTERS YOU HAVE MADE FOR LEAF SUPPLY?
I have a background and training in fine arts and interior architecture, so a lot of my approach to making is problem solving I guess. I have been sketching forms for a while to address how to make saucers for indoor plant pots that don’t look like an afterthought but are part of the overall form. I hope to explore other forms, clays and glazes using the pot made for Leaf Supply as a starting point.

DO YOU HAVE A FAVOURITE INDOOR PLANT?
Hard question to answer! To be honest i’m a bit fickle on my love for indoor plants and swap around a bit. If I had to be forced, I would say Rhipsalis. A hanging planter is on the cards very soon.

WHERE IS YOUR FAVOURITE SPOT TO CONNECT WITH NATURE IN SYDNEY?
I find this really hard to answer as I am actually such a homebody in Sydney. I grew up in the country and miss the open spaces. In actual fact I think simply wherever I am I search out plants and green spaces. It’s not specific to any particular place. I quite like weeds, and the in-between spaces that plants find themselves in.
See more of Hayley's work here.

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